Saturday, 22 June 2024, 1:34 PM
Site: Natural Perfume Academy
Course: Natural Perfume Academy (NPA)
Glossary: Natural Perfume Academy Main Glossary
T

Tagettes/Tagetes

tagetes patula, T. minuta, T. erecta 

Tea Absolutes

Tea absolutes Camellia sinensis , thea chinensis , thea sinensis 

Tenacity

strength of a scent or note characterized by the length of time it lasts on the skin

Tincture

A tincture is an alcoholic extract of natural raw materials. Common tinctures include: Tincture of vanilla, Tincture of Ambrette seed, Tincture of Orris, Tincture of benzoin, and Tincture of Labdanum. 

Tags:

Treemosses

Treemosses usnea / pseudoevernia furfuracea See Oakmoss

Tuberose

Small chunks of dark yellow tuberose concrete, looks like wax, amazing colour.

Tuberose in Perfumery

Tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa) is a highly fragrant perennial plant native to Mexico, and it has been cherished for centuries for its captivating, creamy white blooms that emit an intense, rich floral aroma. In the realm of natural perfumery, tuberose is considered one of the most luxurious and sensual floral notes, often used in high-end and artisanal fragrances.

Characteristics and Extraction

The scent of tuberose is complex and multi-faceted, featuring notes of creaminess, sweetness, and an almost narcotic intensity that is both heady and seductive. This makes it a powerful addition to perfumes, where it often serves as the heart or middle note, providing depth and opulence to a fragrance composition.

Tuberose is typically extracted in two primary forms used in natural perfumery:

  1. Tuberose Absolute: This is obtained through solvent extraction, resulting in a thick, deep-colored liquid that retains the full spectrum of the flower's aroma. Tuberose absolute is highly concentrated and potent, often used in minute quantities due to its strength.

  2. Tuberose Concrete: This solid, waxy substance is also produced via solvent extraction and then refined. Tuberose concrete is admired for its golden color and solid form, which can be further processed to produce the absolute.

Perfumery Uses

Tuberose is a versatile note in perfumery, complementing and enhancing a wide range of other fragrance components. It pairs beautifully with:

  • Other White Florals: Such as jasmine, orange blossom, and gardenia, creating lush, romantic bouquets.

  • Spicy Notes: Like clove and cinnamon, which can temper its sweetness and add warmth.

  • Woody and Balsamic Bases: Such as sandalwood, amber, and vanilla, which provide a rich, enduring foundation for the tuberose's voluptuous aroma.

Example Uses in Fragrance Types:

  • Oriental Perfumes: Tuberose adds a rich floral heart to oriental blends, complementing spices and resins.

  • Floral Bouquets: As a dominant or co-dominant note, tuberose enhances the overall floral experience.

  • Chypre and Green Scents: It adds an opulent floral dimension to the fresh, mossy, and woody components.

Additional Notes

  • Historical Significance: Tuberose has been used in traditional garlands and ceremonial offerings, symbolizing both love and danger due to its intense fragrance.

  • Modern Popularity: It remains a staple in luxury perfumery and niche fragrances, appreciated for its ability to evoke both vintage glamour and modern sophistication.

References

  • "Perfumes: The A-Z Guide" by Luca Turin and Tania Sanchez: This book offers insightful reviews of perfumes, including those featuring tuberose.

  • "The Essence of Perfume" by Roja Dove: A comprehensive guide to the world of perfume, including the role of natural ingredients like tuberose.

  • "Fragrant: The Secret Life of Scent" by Mandy Aftel: A deep dive into the history and use of natural ingredients in perfumery, including tuberose.

Tuberose remains a beloved and pivotal element in natural perfumery, admired for its ability to convey an air of luxury and mystique. Its unique aroma continues to inspire perfumers and captivate fragrance enthusiasts around the world.